Daily Practices – Week 1 – Day 3

Week 1, Day 3

THEME: The resurrection is more than an event, it’s a way of life.

GRACE: Lord, help me experience Your power in my daily life.


Settling in:

  • In a journal, note the day, time, and place you’re sitting.
  • Open with a few moments of silence. Rest, and breathe deeply.
  • Complete the following sentence in your journal: *Today, I feel ________________.
  • Read these words slowly (aloud or silently):

So if you’re serious about living this new resurrection life with Christ, act like it. Pursue the things over which Christ presides. Don’t shuffle along, eyes to the ground, absorbed with the things right in front of you. Look up, and be alert to what is going on around Christ—that’s where the action is. See things from his perspective. (Colossians 3:1-2, MSG)

  • Pause for a few moments of silence.

Practice:

  • Choose one of the following practices.

Option 1: Solitude* [5-10 minutes]

Spend at least five…

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Daily Practices – Week 1 – Day 2

Week One, Day Two

THEME: The resurrection is more than an event, it’s a way of life.

GRACE: Lord, help me experience Your power in my daily life.


Settling in:

  • In a journal, note the day, time, and place you’re sitting.
  • Open with a few moments of silence. Rest, and breathe deeply.
  • Complete the following sentence in your journal: *Today, I feel ________________.
  • Read these words slowly (aloud or silently):

Open for me the gates of the righteous;

    I will enter and give thanks to the Lord. 

This is the gate of the Lord

    through which the righteous may enter.

I will give you thanks, for you answered me;

    you have become my salvation. (Psalm 118:19-21, NIV)

  • Pause for a few moments of silence.

Practice:

  • Choose one of the following practices.

Option 1: Reflection [5-10 minutes]

Take a few moments to prayerfully reflect on your last 24 -hours. Start with the beginning of…

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Daily Practices – Week 1 – Day 1

I am excited that my little church is going through these spiritual exercises together and how Christ may speak to us through them.

THEME: The resurrection is more than an event, it’s a way of life.

GRACE*: Lord, help me experience Your power in my daily life.


Settling in:

  • In a journal, note the day, time, and place you’re sitting.
  • Open with a few moments of silence. Rest, and breathe deeply.
  • Complete the following sentence in your journal: Today, I feel ________________.
  • Read these words slowly (aloud or silently):

Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; his love endures forever.

Let Israel say: “His love endures forever.” (Psalm 118:1-2, NIV)

  • Pause for a few moments of silence.

Practice:

  • Choose one of the following practices.

Option 1: Study [5-30 minutes]

Read through Matthew 28:1-10. Take a few moments to answer some of the following questions in your journal:

  1. Notice the reactions of the guards in verse 4, compared with the women’s reaction in verse 8. What do you think caused such different reactions to…

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Repentance and Salvation: Transcending the Pharisee Within

Eclectic Orthodoxy

“For whoever would save his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it” (Matt 16:25)—here is the heart of Orthodox ethics, Christos Yannaras passionately avers. This may come as a surprise to many. Surely ethics has to do with right and wrong and the acquisition of virtue, whereas this dominical counsel speaks to the spiritual life. Yet Yannaras refuses to separate the spiritual and ethical. “Morality reveals what man is in principle, as the image of God,” he writes, “but also what he becomes through the adventure of his freedom: a being transformed, or ‘in the likeness’ of God” (The Freedom of Morality, p. 24). It’s not that Yannaras does not recognize moral obligation; but he refuses to reduce ethics to law: “All the exhortations and commandments in the  Gospel have as their goal love, that dynamic transcendence of egocentric individuality whereby…

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“Because we are the sons of God, we must become the sons of God”

Eclectic Orthodoxy

God can no more than an earthly parent be content to have only children: he must have sons and daughters– children of his soul, of his spirit, of his love–not merely in the sense that he loves them, or even that they love him, but in the sense that they love like him, love as he loves. For this he does not adopt them; he dies to give them himself, thereby to raise his own to his heart; he gives them a birth from above; they are born again out of himself and into himself–for he is the one and the all. His children are not his real, true sons and daughters until they think like him, feel with him, judge as he judges, are at home with him, and without fear before him because he and they mean the same thing, love the same things, seek the same ends…

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a Prayer for #Primates2016

 

ALMIGHTY and everlasting God, who by thy Holy Spirit didst preside in the Council of the blessed Apostles, and hast promised, through thy Son Jesus Christ, to be with thy Church to the end of the world; We beseech thee to be with the Council of thy Church now assembled in thy Name and Presence. Save our Church from all error, ignorance, pride, and prejudice; and of thy great mercy vouchsafe, we beseech thee, so to direct, sanctify, and govern us in our work, by the mighty power of the Holy Ghost, that the comfortable Gospel of Christ may be truly preached, truly received, and truly followed, in all places, to the breaking down the kingdom of sin, Satan, and death; till at length the whole of thy dispersed sheep, being gathered into one fold, shall become partakers of everlasting life; through the merits and death of Jesus Christ our Saviour. Amen.

Starting yesterday (January 11th), the Primates of the Anglican Communion (including my own Archbishop and Diocesan Bishop, Foley Beach) are gathering to, in all actuality, decide the future of the Communion and how the Anglican Church in North America will play in the Communion.  My prayer is for repentance, reconciliation, and reunion.  Along with the Bishop Frank Weston, in his work that I read last night ‘In Defence of the English Catholic,’ I pray for the eventual reunion of Canterbury and Rome, with the three R’s leading the way there also.

On the cassock and collar

Brothers, we are not gnostics. What we wear projects an image to the world. Clericals, while not our preference, provide an outreach by our mere presence.

Assistant Curate

Clergy vesture is, no doubt, a dull irrelevancy in the minds of some, roughly equivalent to organising the flowers rota. For many, what the clergy wear would appear to be a merely practical distraction from the main, ‘spiritual’ business of the Church. Yet what the Church looks like in its worship, and how the clergy look as they exercise their ministry could never be extraneous or unimportant for those whose Lord took flesh, and who took physical bread and wine and blessed them. Lest we become Gnostics and imagine that the physical and practical are unspiritual, we must give proper attention to these things.

Indeed, to vest clergy in a suit and tie or Bermuda shorts vest, is no less an outworking of a theological and doxological position than to have them in cassock and surplice. Because we are not Gnostics, our bodies – and what we wear on our bodies – is important to us.

An enlightening reflection on cassocks and mission from…

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